Neptune’s Daughter, dir. Herbert Brenon

100 Year Old Movies

100 years ago today, Neptune’s Daughterpremiered at the Globe Theater in New York City. It was the first moving picture to get a substantial screening in this theater previously reserved for “legitimate” productions. The fantasy feature starring Australian swimmer and vaudeville star Annette Kellerman enjoyed great success, breaking a record with its 24-week run at the Fine Arts Theater in Chicago and “delighting nobility” at Shaftesbury Pavilion in England.

Neptune's Daughter Neptune’s Daughter Poster
Source: http://www.inherited-values.com/2010/01/collecting-the-history-of-silent-film/

The film, featuring a nearly-nude Kellerman, stirred some controversy in Malden MA, when it played at the Mystic Theater.

According to this article in the Moving Picture World, the Mystic theater’s proprietor invited the city’s prominent citizens to view the film and weigh in on its merits. Mrs. George M. Chisholm was not pleased with what she saw: “The high dive in which Miss Kellerman is in fleshlings [sic], by swimming to cover when…

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GODZILLA – Alexandre Desplat

MOVIE MUSIC UK

godzillaOriginal Review by Jonathan Broxton

American film makers have been trying to do justice to Godzilla ever since he first appeared in director Ishiro Honda’s classic Japanese monster movie in 1954; although Godzilla is considered to be a significant icon of Japanese culture, Honda was himself inspired to create the King of the Monsters by watching Schoedsack and Cooper’s King Kong, and as such he has his roots in classic Hollywood. There have been 28 official Godzilla films released in Japan, the most recent coming in 2004, but only two American movies (three, if you count Cloverfield): the ill-fated Roland Emmerich directed disaster epic from 1998, which was scored by David Arnold, and this one, which is significantly superior to its predecessor, but still fails to capture the character’s essence according to the purists.

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Day-Time Wife (1939): A Little Too Perfect

Nitrate Diva

dtwposterIf you asked just about any American girl in 1939 to describe her fantasy of “happily every after,” the odds are good that Tyrone Power played a starring role in those daydreams.

He was, as Hollywood reporter Ruth Waterbury gushed, “more than any other man on the screen, the true Prince Charming.”

Which is why Gregory Ratoff’s Day-Time Wife, in its own humble way, strikes me as subversive—scandalous even. It dared to suggest that life with such an outwardly perfect man might not turn out to be so happy after all.

In retrospect, when we think of Tyrone Power rebelling against his studio-endorsed pretty boy image, a number of courageous performances come to mind: the sensitive, disillusioned seeker of The Razor’s Edge, the pathologically selfish carny of Nightmare Alley, and the duplicitous husband of Witness for the Prosecution, to name only a few.

While Day-Time Wife

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“CHEF”: Back to basics

This look funny and interesting

Butler's Cinema Scene

** and Jon Favreau in  "Chef" Emjay Anthony and Jon Favreau in “Chef”

“CHEF” My rating: B (Opening wide on May 22)

115 minutes | MPAA rating: R

The title character of “Chef” works in a hugely lucrative but artistically stifling high-end L.A. restaurant. He has a meltdown and goes off looking to regain his muse of cooking.

Interestingly enough, “Chef “ was written, directed by, and stars Jon Favreau, who first burst onto the scene as an indie auteur (“Swingers,” “Made”) before finding mucho money and Tinseltown clout cranking out superhero movies for the Marvel folk (“Iron Man”).

“Chef” can be seen as Favreau’s return to down-home cooking/filmmaking. Despite its impressively deep cast, it’s a relatively simple, modestly budgeted affair, less a banquet than a delicate palate cleanser.

Nothing earthshaking happens here. No deep emotions are plumbed or existential dilemmas explored.

But if  the film is superficial, it is often slyly funny, has a real handle…

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